Day 9 : Camel Toe Rocks

Air temp: 67 degrees
Humidity: 94% Barometer: 1017 mb and steady
Speed: 6 knots Course: 268 degrees magnetic
Distance Left to Hilo Hawaii: 1582 miles left
Point of Sail: Stbd. beam reach pointed torwards Hawaii
Wind speed: North 10 knots
Swells: From the North at 5-6 ft.
Camanoe’s fish count: Flying fish – 15 Squid – 6

I joke, I joke. Camel toe doesn’t rock. If you’re not sure what Camel toe is, look it up in the Urban Dictionary or do a Google search. However, in the La Cruz anchorage in Mexico, Camanoe was often called “Camel Toe” on the radio. It would go something like this; “Camel Toe, Camel Toe, Camel Toe. This is Chocolate Thunder.” My Camel Toe, a C&C Landfall 39 sloop does rock. For example, everyday on this trip I take a shower down below in the forward head. Not many cruisers can say that. Since this Camel Toe has two heads (bathrooms), one is a designated wet locker/shower. In port, all of our laundry is done in the wet locker in a five gallon bucket with a plastic plunger. She has plenty of power to deep freeze food, run the microwave, listen to the radio all day and watch TV. When company is aboard, she has two state rooms, each with a head. Camel Toe has tons of storage. The Monitor Wind Vane steers a straight course day and night. The SSB allows communication and e-mails, including all of the latest weather data. The LED lighting throughout the boat ensures the cabin is bright and cheery. Her new rod rigging and mast, rebuilt by Chocolate Thunder, allows me to feel relaxed when the wind pipes up at 1000 miles from the nearest help. Her center cockpit, even though it makes the boat difficult to balance sometimes, keeps me dry, even when the rest of the boat is wet from spray and swells breaking on deck. In short, she is a well-built boat. She is comfortable, not overly fast but could be if I pushed her. She has her problems like any other boat, but none of them can’t be fixed without some love and epoxy.

Today has been a fantastic day. Even better than yesterday. Neptune has decided to bless us with calm seas. Nothing over six feet, but mostly three to four foot swells on the beam. We have been making six knots most of the day with the Genoa all the way out and open at the top with a double reef in the main. The double reef in the main sounds excessive but it balances the boat perfectly. The wind vane hardly has to move the wheel. It was calm enough today that I was able to bleach the galley and the aft head. It was even calm enough to go around the boat and the cockpit with my pressurized spray bottle (found at Home Depot in Mexico – to be used for insecticide) and wash off all of the dried salt. For the last week, it appeared it was raining outside because the salt water was so thick on the hatches and port lights. If it’s calm enough tomorrow, I might try some laundry or bake some bread.

We are beginning to study up on the islands in Hawaii. Sounds silly; we’re already on our way there but don’t know much about the place. Stephanie and I were so busy preparing Camel Toe for the trip we didn’t have time to really research the destination. Hawaii sounds like a rugged place for boats. At first glance it doesn’t appear to be overly friendly towards boats. At least on the big island, which is all I have read about so far since this is where I will be making landfall. From what I have read there is only one boat haul out and one very small marina on the big island. The anchorages closest to towns are filled with mooring balls or only hold a few boats, and then you’re only allowed to stay 72 hours. There seems to be a few beautiful anchorages around the big island with lots of room, but these ones are completely secluded from any large towns. They are just a beautiful, secluded beach away from everything. We will have to play it by ear. I’m really looking forward to seeing the two active volcanoes on the big island, Mauna Loa and Kilauea. Apparently Hilo has the best Farmers’ Market in the islands. Not so sure if we’re talking apples and oranges, or bananas, mangos, guavas, coconuts and pineapples. Mauna Kea Mountain at 13,796 feet is supposed to have one of the best stargazing views in the world. We will see if it’s better than it is here in the middle of the Pacific. I’m hoping to explore north of the big island where there are many smaller islands, including all of the well known ones: Oahu, Molokai, Maui, Lana’i, Kahoolawe, Kauai, and Niihau. I would love to get all the way to French Frigate Shoals and Midway Island on my trip back to the States.

Ok, talk to everyone tomorrow, I’m going to go and concoct something known as a hot, buttered rum. Wish me luck.

-CAPT

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3 thoughts on “Day 9 : Camel Toe Rocks

  1. To steer the truest course, you must look a-yonder to the horizon, and steer for the balls of Neptune. They are big and green.. and the saltiest balls of the sea.

  2. The farmer’s market at Hilo is AWESOME! It’s not just tropical fruit. You can pick up tons of veg, Spam sushi (if you haven’t already heard of it, it’s real and it seems to be popular), and some great lunch/dinner fare. Highly recommended. Also – the Mehana Brewery in town makes some respectable beer if you are so inclined.

    Spent a week on the Big Island about two years ago, and it was fantastic. I’ve been jealous of your trip all along, but this might take the cake.

    • And Mauna Kea is a beautiful trip. If it’s a full moon, the stars do get pretty washed out (perhaps duh), but otherwise, the atmosphere is so thin that the view is crystal clear (and the air is cold!). They normally(?) have free telescopes out to look through, and they sell instant ramen for when you get cold.

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